James E. Garrison Sensory Lab - Home


sensory

We are here for all your testing needs. A full service sensory evaluation laboratory equipped to meet the needs of the food industry and academic institutions.

The James E. Garrison Sensory Evaluation Laboratory is a 3,000 square-foot facility, fully equipped with a research and development kitchen, conference rooms for descriptive analyses, and seven booths equipped with Compusense and computers to conduct descriptive and consumer sensory testing of foods. This purpose of this facility is to educate undergraduate and graduate students, to support graduate student research projects, support federal grant funding at the University, and conduct industry testing tailored to meet the needs of companies. In addition, our facility also has the capability to conduct sensory tests on fabrics, textiles, personal care product, cosmetics, etc.

Product Specific Sensory Testing

Chicken breast, breakfast sausage, chicken sausage, pork sausage, dry cured hams, catfish, prawns, shrimp, steak, barbecue sauce, honey mustard sauce, dairy products, enriched rice, and sweet potato products.

James E. Garrison Sensory Lab - Services


Sensory Services

Trained Panels

Descriptive Analysis

  • Product Comparison Product comparison tests can be an effective method to determine how your product compares to your competitor’s. These tests are conducted by trained panels and can provide insights into characteristics that make the difference in why a consumer likes one product over another.

  • Product characterization/development Sensory characterization is one of the most extensively applied tools in sensory science. Descriptive analysis with trained panels has been traditionally used for sensory characterization. This work addresses the development of new evaluation methods and quality assessment for trained sensory panels.

  • Preference mapping Preference mapping is statistical techniques used to develop an understanding of consumer preferences. Results of preference mapping analysis can be used to assist in product development.

  • Shelf-life determination The length of time for which foods must be consumed can be determined by using storage trials to estimate the physical, chemical, and microbiological stability of food.

Difference Testing

  • Triangle Tests The triangle test is a discriminative method with many uses in sensory science including: gauging if an overall difference is present between two products, selecting qualified panelists for a particular test, or determining whether shifts in processing or ingredients have significantly changed a product. (Society of Sensory Professionals)

  • Difference from control-tests The difference from control test is classified as an overall difference test. It is similar to the degree of difference test, in that it is used to determine if there is, in fact, a difference between one or more test samples and a control. And, more importantly, if there is a difference, its size can also be measured with this test. (Society of Sensory Professionals)

  • Similarity Tests Similarity test are used to determine if two samples are sufficiently similar. This is especially helpful when reformulating products for reduced costs and validating alternate suppliers for ingredients.

  • Alternate Forced Choice Testing Alternatively forced choice (AFC) test is defined by ASTM International as: "method in which 2, 3, or more stimuli are presented, and assessors are given a criterion by which they are required to select one stimulus.

  • Power Determinations An important aspect of designing an experiment is to determine the number of observations needed to make conclusions of sufficient accuracy and confident. The sample size neeed depends on what type of experiment is being contemplated, how it will be conducted, resources, and desired sensitivity and confidence. Generally, increasing the number of replications increases the sensitivity and makes it easier to detect small differences.


Consumer Panels

  • Consumer Acceptability/comparison tests: Determining the feasibility of whether a product or service will be acceptable to the consumer is performed through consumer acceptability tests. Cluster analysis comprises a set of statistical techniques that aim to group “objects” into homogenous subsets. The objects can be people or products. For example, cluster analysis can be used to segment people (consumers) into subsets based on their liking ratings for a set of products. Such consumer segmentation is an essential step in preference mapping, where the goal is to understand drivers of consumer liking, and cluster analysis is used to summarize differences among consumers in their likes and dislikes.

  • Preference tests: These tests supply information about people's likes and dislikes of a product. They are not intended to evaluate specific characteristics, such as crunchiness or smoothness. They are subjective tests and include pair comparison, hedonic, and scoring.

  • Ranking tests: If more than two samples are evaluated, a preference ranking test may be complteed. Usually three to five samples are the most that can be efficiently ranked by a consumer. This test asks the consumer to order the samples based on preference, with a ranking of "1" meaning most preferred.

  • Clust analysis: A statistical technique that aim to group "objects" into homogenour subsets. For example, clust analysis can be used to segment people (consumers) into subset based on the liking ratings for a set of products. Such consumer segmentation is an essential step in preference mapping, where the goal is to understand drivers of consumer liking, and cluster analysis is used to summarize differences among consumers in their likes and dislikes.

James E. Garrison Sensory Lab - Panels


Sensory Panels

Consumer Panels

  • Consumer Acceptability/comparison tests: Determining the feasibility of whether a product or service will be acceptable to the consumer is performed through consumer acceptability tests. Cluster analysis comprises a set of statistical techniques that aim to group “objects” into homogenous subsets. The objects can be people or products. For example, cluster analysis can be used to segment people (consumers) into subsets based on their liking ratings for a set of products. Such consumer segmentation is an essential step in preference mapping, where the goal is to understand drivers of consumer liking, and cluster analysis is used to summarize differences among consumers in their likes and dislikes.

  • Preference tests: These tests supply information about people's likes and dislikes of a product. They are not intended to evaluate specific characteristics, such as crunchiness or smoothness. They are subjective tests and include pair comparison, hedonic, and scoring.

  • Ranking tests: If more than two samples are evaluated, a preference ranking test may be complteed. Usually three to five samples are the most that can be efficiently ranked by a consumer. This test asks the consumer to order the samples based on preference, with a ranking of "1" meaning most preferred.

  • Clust analysis: A statistical technique that aim to group "objects" into homogenour subsets. For example, clust analysis can be used to segment people (consumers) into subset based on the liking ratings for a set of products. Such consumer segmentation is an essential step in preference mapping, where the goal is to understand drivers of consumer liking, and cluster analysis is used to summarize differences among consumers in their likes and dislikes.

James E. Garrison Sensory Lab - Education


Sensory-Education

The Sensory Service Center is housed in the Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion. We offer bachelors, masters and doctorate degrees with a concentration in Food Science.

For graduate programs, teaching assistantships and research assistantships may be available if you are qualified. Please check the graduate studies in the department here or contact the Office of Graduate School here.

Our master’s degree usually can be completed in 2 years and doctorate degree in 3 years (after a master degree), our graduates usually are able to find good jobs after completion of their degrees in lots of food companies, e.g. Johnsonville Sausages, Nestle, Red-Diamond, Smuckers, Kellogg’s, Lopez foods, Hormel Foods, Reed Food Technology, Newly Weds Food...

James E. Garrison Sensory Lab - Research


Sensory-Research

Sensory Publications (Since 2013)

  1. Schilling, M.W., Silva, J.L. Pham, A.J., Kim, T, D’Abramo, L.R., Jackson, V. 2013. Sensory enhancement of freshwater prawns through salt acclimation prior to harvesting. J. Aquat. Food Product Technology. 22:129-136.
  2. Kamadia, V.V., Schilling, M.W., Marshall, D.L. 2013. Effect of cooking and packaging methods on consumer acceptability and shelf-life of Ready-to-Eat shrimp. Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology. 22:146-159.
  3. Kin, S., Graham, R.G., Tolentino, A.C., Pham, A.J., Smith, B.S., Kim, T., Silva, J.L., Schilling, M.W. 2013. Physiochemical and sensory properties of smoked catfish sausage. J. Aquatic Food Product Technology. 22:496-507.
  4. Crist, C.A., Williams, J.B., Schilling, M.W., Hood, A.F., Smith, B.S., Campano, S.G. 2014. Impact of sodium lactate and acetic acid derivatives on the quality of fresh Italian pork sausage links. Meat Science. 96:1509:1516.
  5. Desai, M.D. Joseph, P., Suman, S., Silva, J., Kim, T., Schilling, M.W. 2014. Proteomic characterization of the red color defect in raw channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fillets. LWT-Food Science and Technology. 57:141-148.
  6. Ciaramella, M., Allen, P., Joseph, P., D’Abramo, L. Silva, J.L., Kim, T., Kurve, V., Zhao, Y., Desai. M.A. Schilling, M.W. 2014. Effect of salt treatments on survival and consumer acceptability of freshwater prawn, Macrobranchium rosenbergii. Aquaculture. 428-429C:184-188.
  7. Desai, M.A., Kurve, V., Soni, K., Smith, B.S., Campano, S.G. Schilling, M.W. 2014. Utilization of buffered vinegar to increase the shelf-life of chicken retail cuts packaged in a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Poultry Science. 93:1850:1854.
  8. Kurve, V., Joseph, P. Williams, J.B., Boland, H., Riffell, S.K., Schilling, M.W. 2015. Meat quality and consumer sensory acceptance of beef from cattle that are fed native warm season grasses during the stocker phase. Journal of Animal Science. 93: 5: 2576-2586
  9. Zhao, Y., Abbar, S., Phillips, T.W., Schilling, M.W. 2015. Phosphine Fumigation and Residues in Dry-Cured Ham in Commercial Applications. Meat Science. 107:55-63.
  10. Schilling, M.W., Radhakrishnan, V., Thaxton, Y.V., Christensen, K., Poulson, J., Williams, J.B. 2015. The effects of low atmosphere stunning and deboning time on the sensory attributes; and consumer acceptability of broiler breast using different cooking methods. Poultry Science. 94:1379-1388.
  11. Coker, C.E.H., Posadas, B., Schilling, M.W. 2015. Sensory evaluation studies provide growers with market insight. Acta Hortic. 1090:25-28.
  12. Kurve, V., Joseph, P. Williams, J.B., Boland, H., Riffell, S.K., Smith, T., Schilling, M.W. 2016. Meat quality and sensory attributes of beef from cattle that were fed native warm season grass during the stocker phase and finished on grain. Meat Science. 112:31-38.
  13. Zhao, Y., Abbar, S., Phillips, T.W., Schilling, M.W. 2016. Development of food-grade coatings for dry-cured ham. Meat Science. Meat Science. 113:73-79.
  14. Zhai, W., Schilling, M.W., Jackson, V., Peebles, E.D., Mercier, Y. 2016. Effects of dietary lysine and methionine supplementation on Ross 708 male broilers from 21 to 42 days of age (II): Breast meat quality. J. Applied Poultry Res.25:212-222.
  15. Coatney, K.T., Freeman, M.A., Allen, P.J., Ciaramella, M.A., Schilling, M.W. 2016. Willingness-to-Pay for Value-Added Freshwater Prawns. Aquaculture Economics and Management. doi:10.1080/13657305.2016.1180645
  16. Zhao, Y., Jackson, V., Ciaramella, M.A., Lolley, A.T., Allen, P.J., Schilling, M.W. 2016. Impact of marination, pre-harvest salt acclimation, and sodium chloride concentration on the sensory acceptability of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Aquaculture Research. doi:10.1111/are.13044
  17. Alford, A. Schilling, M.W. Kaminski, R.M. 2016. Consumer acceptability of crayfish harvested from commercial production fields and moist-soil wetlands. J. Aquatic Food Product Technology. doi:0.1080/10498850.2014.961667.
  18. Desai, M., Jackson, V., Zhai, W., Suman, S.P., Nair, M., Beach, C., Schilling, M.W. 2016. Proteome basis of pale, soft, and exudative broiler breast (Pectoralis major) meat. Poultry Science. doi: 10.3382/ps/pew213
  19. Ciaramella, M.A., Allen, P.J., Kim, T., Avery, J.A., Schilling, M.W. 2016. The effects of sequential environmental and harvest stressors on the sensory characteristics of cultured channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fillets. Journal of Food Science. doi: 10.1111/1750-3841.13374

James E. Garrison Sensory Lab - Contact


Sensory-Contact

Dr. Wes Schilling

Principal Investigator
Email: schilling@foodscience.msstate.edu
Office Phone: (662) 325-9546

Office Address:

Mailstop 9805
Herzer Bldg., Rm 106
Mississippi State, MS 39762

Yan Campbell

Staff
Email: ycampbell@foodscience.msstate.edu
Office Phone: (662) 325-8366

Office Address:

Mailstop 9805
James Garrison Sensory Evaluation Laboratory, Rm 112
Mississippi State, MS 39762

Physical Address:

945 Stone Blvd.
Mississippi State, MS 39762

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